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Community Pharmacy-Based Point-of-Care Testing Certificate Course
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PPA is hosting a certificate program on Thursday, October 1 in Grantville on Community Pharmacy-Based Point-of-Care Testing

10/1/2015
When: Thursday, October 1, 2015
8 AM to 5:15 PM
Where: Holiday Inn Harrisburg-Hershey (Grande III & IV)
604 Station Road
Grantville, Pennsylvania  17028
United States
Presenter: Brandon Antinopoulos, PharmD
Contact: Sara Powers
(717) 234-6151 x. 2


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Course Description

  • WHO: This course provides community pharmacists and members of academia, industry and government with the skills necessary to develop and implement a collaborative testing program for influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C.
  • WHY: There is a recognized need for community pharmacists to collaboratively improve patient access to care through the use of point-of-care tests.
  • HOW: The course's 20 hours of continuing education (12 hours of home study and 8 hours of live training) will cover information on the targeted disease state, the physical assessment of a patient presenting to a community pharmacist, point-of-care tests and how to establish a point-of-care testing service.

Pricing

PPA Members: $339 (Special Price for CMMC Members: $199)

Non-PPA Members: $589 (Special Price for CMMC Members: $449)

Includes breakfast and lunch!

 

The Comprehensive Medication Management Collaborative (CMMC) is PPA's entry point gateway to an exciting new learning collaborative focusing on opportunities to provide direct patient care through medication management services. Learn more and sign up today!

 

Certificate Course Home-Study Module (12 hours)

Introduction

  • Recognize the need for pharmacist intervention in the community setting to improve patient access to medical care through the use of point-of-care tests.
  • Summarize testing recommendations for influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C.

Target Disease States

  • Describe the transmission and pathogenesis of influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C.
  • Identify patients at high-risk for acquiring and experiencing complications related to influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C.
  • Summarize the time course of influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C infections.
  • Discuss the management options for a patient with influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C infection.
  • List important counseling points for prescription medications used to treat influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C infections.

Physical Assessment

  • List common signs and symptoms of influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C infections.
  • Describe the steps involved with the physical assessment of a patient presenting to a community pharmacy with an ongoing infectious disease.

POC Tests

  • Recognize how POC tests differ from the historical "gold standards" for diagnostic testing.
  • Define the terms sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value.
  • Describe how POC tests may be utilized in the community pharmacy setting as part of innovative practice models.
  • Explain what it means for a diagnostic test to be CLIA-waived and what is required in order to use CLIA-waived POC tests in the community pharmacy setting.

POC Tests in Practice

  • Outline the process and key considerations of making a pharmacy-based infectious diseases management program operational and integrated with existing services.
  • Explain the legal, regulatory and liability issues involved in offering a pharmacy-based infectious diseases management program.
  • Discuss important considerations in documenting, marketing and obtaining compensation for a pharmacy-based infectious diseases management program.
  • Identify measures to track the economic, clinical and humanistic outcomes for a pharmacy-based infectious diseases management program.

Home Study Competency Assessment

  • Online multiple-choice assessment.

 

Certificate Course Agenda

7:30-8 a.m. - Registration

8-8:30 a.m. - Introduction and Use of Point-of-Care (POC) Tests by Pharmacists

  • Identify opportunities for pharmacists to expand their practice in the community setting through the utilization of POC tests.
  • Summarize the prevalence and impact of various infectious diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemias, influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C in the United States.

8:30-9:45 a.m. - Physical Assessment

  • Discuss the value and limitations of various physical assessment procedures, including temperature, pulse, blood pressure, respiratory rate, pulse oximetry and physical inspection.
  • Describe the procedures for conducting a systematic physical assessment and identify normal and critical findings.
  • Interpret physical assessment data and recognize limitations of the data.

9:45-10 a.m. - Break

10-10:30 a.m. - Physical Assessment Competency

  • Demonstrate the ability to appropriately collect a patient's temperature, pulse, blood pressure, respiratory rate and pulse oximetry.

10:30-11:15 a.m. - Disease State Presentation and Patient Cases

  • Differentiate influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C from other disease states with similar presentations.
  • Discuss the complications associated with influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C.
  • Given a patient case, identify patients that may qualify for pharmacy-based POC testing by a pharmacist versus those that require immediate referral to a physician/provider.

11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. - Specimen Collection

  • Describe the process for collecting patient specimens, including throat swab, nasal swab, oral fluid and whole blood.
  • Demonstrate the ability to correctly collect patient specimens, including throat swab, nasal swab, oral fluid and whole blood.

12:15-1 p.m. - Lunch Break

1-2 p.m. - Pharmacy Law and Risk Management

  • Define CLIA.
  • Explain CLIA-waiver and the process for becoming a CLIA-waived site.
  • Recognize the procedures necessary for legal processing of CLIA-waived tests.
  • List at least three risk management techniques to manage liability when conducting CLIA-waived tests.
  • Search statutes and regulations to determine his/her state's requirements for pharmacist involvement in CLIA-waived testing.

2-3 p.m. - Developing and Implementing a POC Testing Service

  • Discuss specific strategies for designing and implementing a successful pharmacy-based POC testing program.
  • Explain how to bill for POC testing using the appropriate CPT codes.
  • Document services in a manner appropriate for evaluating patient progress, sufficient for billing purposes, and that facilitates tracking clinical and financial outcomes.

3-3:15 p.m. - Break

3:15-4:15 p.m. - Test Utilization and Interpretation

  • Given the performance characteristics of a test (e.g., sensitivity, specificity, percent agreement, etc.), determine the reliability of the test in a community pharmacy setting.
  • Identify ways for community pharmacists to maximize the reliability of a given diagnostic test.
  • Discuss some limitations to utilizing POC tests in the community pharmacy setting.
  • Recognize common missteps in POC test processing and interpretation that could lead to incorrect results.
  • List the steps a pharmacy can take to ensure compliance with Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) standards.

4:15-5:15 p.m. - POC Cases and Proficiency Assessment

  • Identify clinically unstable patients who should be immediately referred to the appropriate source of care.
  • Provided a patient scenario, make recommendations for the use of POC tests.
  • Collaboratively develop a patient care plan based on medical history, physical assessment data and results of POC tests.

5:15 p.m. - Adjourn

 


 

Continuing Education Information

The National Association of Chain Drug Stores is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

Practice-based Community Pharmacy-Based Point-of-Care Testing Certificate ACPE University Activity #0206-9999-15-012-B04-P. Initial Release Date: 1/08/2015; Expiration Date: 1/08/2018. 

Presenter

Brandon Antinopoulos, PharmD, Pennsylvania Pharmacists Care Network (PPCN) Coordinator, Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association; and other faculty as to be determined.


Target Audience

This course provides community pharmacists and members of academia, industry and government with the skills necessary to develop a testing program for influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C. 

Claiming Credit

Continuing pharmacy education (CPE) credit will be awarded for the certificate training course only. This is a practice-based activity and is primarily constructed to instill, expand or enhance practice competencies through the systematic achievement of specified knowledge, skills, attitudes and perfomance behaviors.

Successful completion of the live seminar component involves passing the final exam with a grade of 70 percent or higher and demonstrating proficiency in diagnostic testing techniques. Successful completion of this component will result in 8.0 contact hours of continuing pharmacy education credit. Successful completion of the self-study component involves passing the self-study assessment questions with a grade of 70 percent or higher and will result in 12.0 contact hours of continuing pharmacy education. Attendance and participation are required before obtaining CPE credit. Partial credit will not be awarded.

CPE Monitor, a national, collaborative effort by ACPE and the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) to provide an electronic system for pharmacists to track their completed PCE credits, went into effect on Jan. 1, 2013. NACDS, as an ACPE-accredited provider, is required to report pharmacist CPE credit using this new tracking system. Pharmacist participants must provide their NABP e-Profile identification number and date of birth (in MMDD format) when they register for a CPE activity. It will be the responsibility of the pharmacist to provide the correct information (i.e., e-Profile identification number and date of birth in MMDD format). If this information is not provided, NABP and ACPE prohibit NACDS from issuing CPE credit. Online access to their inventory of completed credits will allow pharmacists to easily monitor their compliance with CPE requirements and print statements of credit. Therefore, NACDS will not provide printed statements of credit to pharmacists. If you have not signed up for CPE Monitor, please go to MyCPEMonitor.net.

Learning Objectives

Certificate Course

Introduction and Use of Point-of-Care (POC) Tests by Pharmacists

  • Identify opportunities for pharmacists to expand the scope of their practice in the community setting through the utilization of POC tests.
  • Summarize the prevalence and impact of various infectious diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemias, influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C in the United States.

Physical Assessment

  • Discuss the value and limitations of various physical assessment procedures, including temperature, pulse, blood pressure, respiratory rate, pulse oximetry and physical inspection.
  • Describe the procedures for conducting a systematic physical assessment and identify normal and critical findings.
  • Interpret physical assessment data and recognize limitations of the data.

Physical Assessment Competency

  • Demonstrate the ability to appropriately collect a patient's temperature, pulse, blood pressure, respiratory rate and pulse oximetry.

Disease State Presentation and Patient Cases

  • Differentiate influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C from other disease states with similar presentations.
  • Discuss the complications associated with influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C.
  • Given a patient case, identify patients that may qualify for pharmacy-based POC testing by a pharmacist versus those that require immediate referral to a physician/provider.

Specimen Collection

  • Describe the process for collecting patient specimens, including throat swab, nasal swab, oral fluid and whole blood.
  • Demonstrate the ability to correctly collect patient specimens, including throat swab, nasal swab, oral fluid and whole blood.

Pharmacy Law and Risk Management

  • Define CLIA.
  • Explain CLIA-waiver and the process for becoming a CLIA-waived site.
  • Recognize the procedures necessary for legal processing of CLIA-waived tests.
  • List at least three risk management techniques to manage liability when conducting CLIA-waived tests.
  • Search statutes and regulations to determine his/her state's requirements for pharmacist involvement in CLIA-waived testing.

Developing and Implementing a POC Testing Service

  • Discuss specific strategies for designing and implementing a successful pharmacy-based POC testing program.
  • Explain how to bill for POC testing using the appropriate CPT codes.
  • Document services in a manner appropriate for evaluating patient progress, sufficient for billing purposes, and that facilitates tracking clinical and financial outcomes.

Test Utilization and Interpretation

  • Given the performance characteristics of a test (e.g., sensitivity, specificity, percent agreement, etc.), determine the reliability of the test in a community pharmacy setting.
  • Identify ways for community pharmacists to maximize the reliability of a given diagnostic test.
  • Discuss some limitations to utilizing POC tests in the community pharmacy setting.
  • Recognize common missteps in POC test processing and interpretation that could lead to incorrect results.
  • List the steps a pharmacy can take to ensure compliance with Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) standards.

POC Cases and Proficiency Assessment

  • Identify clinically unstable patients who should be immediately referred to the appropriate source of care.
  • Provided a patient scenario, make recommendations for the use of POC tests.
  • Develop a patient care plan based on medical history, physical assessment data and results of POC tests.

Home-Study Course

Introduction

  • Recognize the need for pharmacist intervention in the community setting to improve patient access to medical care through the use of point-of-care tests.
  • Summarize testing recommendations for influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C.

Target Disease States

  • Describe the transmission and pathogenesis of influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C.
  • Identify patients at high-risk for acquiring and experiencing complications related to influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C.
  • Summarize the time course of influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C infections.
  • Discuss the management options for a patient with influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C infection.
  • List important counseling points for prescription medications used to treat influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C infections.

Physical Assessment

  • List common signs and symptoms of influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C infections.
  • Describe the steps involved with the physical assessment of a patient presenting to a community pharmacy with an ongoing infectious disease.

POC Tests

  • Recognize how POC tests differ from the historical "gold standards" for diagnostic testing.
  • Define the terms sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value.
  • Describe how POC tests may be utilized in the community pharmacy setting as part of innovative practice models.
  • Explain what it means for a diagnostic test to be CLIA-waived and what is required in order to use CLIA-waived POC tests in the community pharmacy setting.

POC Tests in Practice

  • Outline the process and key considerations of making a pharmacy-based infectious diseases management program operational and integrated with existing services.
  • Explain the legal, regulatory and liability issues involved in offering a pharmacy-based infectious diseases management program.
  • Discuss important considerations in documenting, marketing and obtaining compensation for a pharmacy-based infectious diseases management program.
  • Identify measures to track the economic, clinical and humanistic outcomes for a pharmacy-based infectious diseases management program.

Home Study Competency Assessment

  • Online multiple-choice assessment.

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